Sarah Thornton on “33 Artists in 3 Acts” a BAM/PFA sponsored event. Sunday / 11.9.14 / 3:00

Sunday / 11.9.14 / 3:00

Join us for an illustrated lecture and booksigning with writer and sociologist of art Sarah Thornton, author of the bestselling Seven Days in the Art World. In her new book, 33 Artists in 3 Acts, Thornton asks the simple but profound question: what is an artist? She traveled the globe to observe and interview over one hundred artists from fourteen countries on five continents, dividing the stories she brought back into three linked “acts”—politics, kinship, and craft—in order to delve deeply into what motivates artists and how they relate to the broader world.
Thornton writes regularly for the Economist and many other publications. Seven Days in the Art World, which explores the precious ecosystem of art dealers, collectors, curators, and critics, was described as “a field guide to the nomadic tribes of the contemporary art world” and named one of the best art books of 2008 by the New York Times.
Moderated by Laura Richard, PhD candidate, UC Berkeley History of Art Department

Gund Theater. Included with admission
Copresented by UC Berkeley Departments of History of Art and Art Practice

 

UC BERKELEY ART MUSEUM & PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE GALLERIES

2626 Bancroft Way, Berkeley | 510.642.0808 |

bampfa.berkeley.edu facebook.com/bampfa | twitter.com/bampfa

*Wheelchair accessible
A wheelchair is available at no charge at the Bancroft Avenue entrance*

Group Show Featuring Stephanie Syjuco: “Alien She” at YBCA

October 24, 2014 – January 25, 2015
Opening reception Friday, Oct 24, 8pm

Alien She is the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl, a pioneering punk feminist movement that emerged in the early 1990s in reaction to pervasive and violent sexism, racism, and homophobia in the punk music scene and in the culture at large. Emphasizing female and youth empowerment, collaborative organization, creative resistance, and DIY ethics, Riot Grrrl helped a new generation to become active feminists and create their own culture . This exhibition focuses on seven people whose visual art practices were informed by their contact with Riot Grrrl, in addition to a historical section sampling the movement’s vast creative output through hundreds of self-published zines, hand-designed posters, musical playlists representing different Riot Grrrl scenes internationally, video interviews, and more.

Each artist is represented by several projects from the last 20 years, including new and rarely seen works, providing an insight into the development of their creative practices and individual trajectories. Featured artists include: Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Tammy Rae Carland, Miranda July, Faythe Levine, Allyson Mitchell, L.J. Roberts, and Stephanie Syjuco.

Alien She is curated by Astria Suparak and Ceci Moss, and organized by the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University.

Art Practice’s Katherine Sherwood exhibiting at Gallery Paule Anglim

October 8 – November 15, 2014

Reception: Thursday October 16, 5:30-7:30pm
Gallery Paule Anglim is pleased to announce an exhibition of mixed media paintings by Katherine Sherwood.

The artist will present a series of large compositions, new departures on the Odalisque form. Sherwood paints and collages her odalisque figures on a cloth support made from found reproductions of famous paintings. Binding the small canvases (old prints used in the classroom to teach art) together with strips of linen, she creates her work on the reverse of the large, un-stretched patchwork.

Sherwood is known for her combination of the traditional technique of painting on canvas in combination with collage of digital imagery. In the new paintings she layers the digital images over the recycled paintings, adding another perceptual layer, repurposing old images to make the new.

Central to art history, the image of the disrobed reclining female has been employed by many male artists, among them Goya, Giorgione, Ingres and Manet. In their day, the highly charged treatments stirred social expectations of the meaning of the horizontal female form, at the time seen as an object embodying standards of womanhood, beauty and sexuality. Sherwood elaborates on the stereotype, allowing others onto this stage. She addresses the question: What if the figure ‘at rest’, pensive (like a Greek philosopher), is disabled? One wears a brace, one is an amputee, and one has a cane. The interpretation is further challenged by replacing the faces with images of the brain.

Katherine Sherwood has exhibited at Gallery Paule Anglim for over 20 years. She is a Professor of Art Practice at University of California, Berkeley and has been the recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, a Guggenheim Fellowship Award and the Adeline Kent Award from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her works are in the collections of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, SFMOMA, the Berkeley Art Museum and the San Jose Museum of Art.

Concurrent with Sherwood’s exhibition, Paule Anglim will present paintings by noted Bay Area painter Joan Brown (1938 – 1990) that were created during the period where she was teaching at UC Berkeley.

Art Practice’s Ehren Tool in two shows!

One Death Is A Tragedy
2 x 2 Solos: Ehren Tool
Curated by Michele Carlson

September 30 – October 31, 2014
Artist Reception: First Friday, October 3, 6-8pm
Live Cup-Making: Saturday, October 4, 11am-4pm
Live Cup-Making: Saturday, October 11, 11am-4pm
Live Decals: Saturday, October 18, 11am-4pm
Cup Handout: Saturday, October 25, 2pm

Link to exhibition information.

 

CRAFT IN AMERICA

Service episode preview 2 min 40 sec

Watch a 30 sec preview of Craft in America: SERVICE, premering on PBS November 2, 2014 (*check local listings). SERVICE: exploring creativity, healing and our nation’s soldiers and veterans. Featuring ceramic artist Ehren Tool, potter Judas Recendez, Peter Voulkos and other G.I. Bill artists, Pam DeLuco and the Paper Doll Project, and Eugene Burks Jr, saddler at the U.S. Army Caisson Platoon.

New Course Featuring Art Practice Greg Niemeyer: Sensing Cityscapes

Professors Greg Niemeyer (Art Practice) and Ron Rael (C.E.D.) are co-teaching a course entitled SENSING CITYSCAPES: SENSORS, CITIES, POLICIES/BASIC PROTOCOLS FOR NEW MEDIA in which students create and interrogate tools for collecting data on urban metabolisms. Through a suite of practical projects, the course introduces methods for retrieving and working with existing city data, investigating cities through surveys and mapping, generating data through digital sensing and ways of presenting data publicly. Students are actively partnering with the  City of San Leandro to find new ways of collecting and using data to improve city planning.

Four of our six MFA students have received the prestigious Murphy Cadogan award!

The Jack K. and Gertrude Murphy Fellowships, and Edwin Anthony and Adelaide Boudreaux Cadogan Scholarships help fuel the continued forward-thinking, visual arts movement that makes the Bay Area unique. Established in 1986, these awards are designed to further the development of Bay Area MFA students’ and to foster the exploration of their artistic potential in digital art, film/video, hybrid practice, installation, mixed media, painting, photography, and sculpture. Winners receive $5,000 in tuition assistance and have their work displayed in a professionally-curated exhibition at SOMArts Cultural Center. – See more at: http://sff.org/programs/awards-programs/art-awards/murphy-and-cadogan-contemporary-art-awards/#sthash.pE1YUtGs.dpuf

The four MFA students who have received the award are:

Leslie Dreyer
Tanja Geis
Lee Lavy
Matt Smith

 

A Gallery Event and Discussion: Queer Ecologies -w- Kim Anno

A gallery event and discussion featuring:
Kim Anno: Water City, Berkeley (Film, 2013)
And
Adrian Parr: So to Speak (spoken word performance)

Thursday, September 11. 5:00 -7:00 PM.
Wurster Hall Gallery (110). UC Berkeley.
Internationally recognized photographer, painter and film/video artist Kim Anno will present her provocative 2013 film entitled “Water City, Berkeley.”Anno’s film explores questions surrounding climate change, cultural identity, and the role of aesthetics in social change. The screening of the film will be followed by a spoken word performance entitled “So to Speak” by the ecological critic and social theorist Adrian Parr. After her performance, Parr will also comment upon Kim Anno’s film, exploring how it connects ecological change and cultural difference, and considering the role of aesthetics in forming activist communities and new political imaginaries. The event is free and open to the UC Berkeley Community and the general public. Light refreshments will be served following the discussion.

KIM ANNO is a painter, photographer, and film/video artist whose work has been collected and exhibited by museums nationally and internationally. Her recent interests and expertise have been in the intersection of art and science, particularly in aesthetic issues surrounding climate change, water, and adaptation. The influence of abstraction and abstracting something remains prominent in Anno’s practice, with resulting work that remains, as she notes, “open, playful, and engaged with a kind of difficult beauty.” Anno collaborates with other artists and musicians, integrating video, sculpture, sound, and interactivity in performative installations and books. She is currently at work on a series of paintings and photographs, and a multi chapter interdisciplinary video work: “Men and Women in Water Cities,” with the 2013 film “Water City, Berkeley” to be shown at this event.

ADRIAN PARR is an acclaimed social and environmental theorist. She holds a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology and the School of Architecture and Interior Design at the University of Cincinnati. Her research focuses on environmental politics, water access, and the built environment. In 2011 Parr received the distinguished Rieveschl Award for Scholarly and Creative Work. In 2013 she and Professor Dion Dionysiou were appointed as UNESCO Co-Chairs of Water Accessibility and Sustainability. Parr currently serves as Chair of Taft Faculty and Director of the Charles Phelps Taft Research Center, University of Cincinnati.

This event is made possible by the generous support of the Arcus Endowment at the College of Environmental Design, UC Berkeley.

Co-sponsored by the Queer Cultural Center, San Francisco.

Media for Social Change, 2014

We wanted to share with you information on a dynamic class given here at Art Practice.

“This is an upper division class surveying new media from a lens of personal transformation and artistic activism as a means to create positive social change. In this course, we will look at the uses of mass media in contemporary society worldwide—news, advertising, propaganda, censorship, and power—and consider the tremendous potential this medium has to subvert and transcend these uses—through art, activism, collaboration, transparency, global accessibility, and citizen journalism—as a powerful tool in hands of a technologically savvy generation.”

Please check out the latest, incredibly dynamic, and strong works created by our students.