Gavin Jantjes – Visiting Artist Lecture 7:30-9pm 9/26/2016

The UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lecture Series Presents:

GAVIN JANTJES

7:30 – 9 pm, Monday, September 26th, 2016

160 Kroeber Hall, UC Berkeley Campus

Free, Accessible, and Open to the Public

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Gavin Jantjes, A South African Coloring Book: Colour These People Dead, via Tate.org, 1974-5.

Gavin Jantjes, A South African Coloring Book: Colour These People Dead, via Tate.org, 1974-5.

 

The UC Berkeley Department of Art Practice invites you to attend the first of our Fall 2016 Wiesenfeld Visiting Artist Lectures, featuring Gavin Jantjes.

“The racial label put on a non-white child at birth is not only a badge of a race, it is a permanent brand of inferiority, the brand of class distinction. Throughout his life his race label will warn all concerned which doors are open to him, and which are closed.”

— Gavin Jantjes, A South African Coloring Book: Classify this Coloured, via Tate.org, 1974-5.

Gavin Jantjes (b. 1948, Capetown, South Africa) is an artist, curator, teacher, and author. His painting and multi-media practice is rooted in his experience as an anti-apartheid activist in the 1970’s. During the 1970’s he created his most well-known work, A South African Coloring Book, a series of screenprints in book format constructed from photographs, newspaper articles, drawings, and text representative of apartheid. The presentation as a child’s coloring book is jarringly incongruent with the racist violence and hatred depicted in the imagery. In response to this work the ruling Afrikaner Nationalist Party censored and banned Jantjes’ work and he was forced to go into exile.

Jantjes has been active as a curator and director at critically important European arts institutions, including the Arts Council of Great Britain, The Tate Gallery in London, the Serpentine Gallery, and the Henie-Onstad Kunstsenter in Oslo, Norway, where he resides.

“African works of art appear meaningless unless seen in relation to Africa’s cultural and historic reality … The environments of today’s Africa demand liberation from inhumanity. Can the art of Africa ignore this demand? Can it be anything else than art for liberation’s sake?”

—Gavin Jantjes, Graphic Work 1974 – 1978, Kulturhuset Stockholm, p. 7.

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